Recent Articles

A Question of Monarchs

August 26, 2014By
A Question of Monarchs

A line of people curves like the body of a giant caterpillar, twisting up the mountain into the endangered oyamel fir forest. Michoacán, Mexico—the cloud-misted overwintering site of the monarch butterfly.

Near the middle of the caterpillar of people, I kept pace, thinking about Catholic peregrinos who journey on well-worn footpaths and roads, sometimes hundreds of miles, to reach a precious relic…

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Monarch butterfly population set to rise this year

August 26, 2014By
Monarch butterfly population set to rise this year

Population numbers are up from the lowest ever recorded in 2013 After a devastating drop in population numbers over the past two years, the monarch butterfly is poised to make a comeback this summer. The increase is being noticed at Point Pelee National Park in Leamington, Ont., the final Canadian stop of the monarchs’ annual […]

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How Do We Save the Iconic Monarch Butterfly?

August 26, 2014By
How Do We Save the Iconic Monarch Butterfly?

Chip Taylor is the founder and director of Monarch Watch.

He talks about the recent decline of the monarch butterfly due mainly to habitat loss, pesticide use and government policies that encourage ethanol production, and how there will need to be a massive effort to plant milkweed if we hope to save this iconic species.

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Nina Veteto, Divide and Multiply

August 26, 2014By
Nina Veteto, Divide and Multiply

For longtime butterfly lover Nina Veteto, a plant called Milkweed is the answer to the disappearing Monarch butterfly and their declining 2,000-mile annual migration.

Based in North Carolina, Nina’s project Divide and Multiply aims to propagate Milkweed, which is essential for healthy Monarch habitat. They will then distribute the plants to 15 non-profit organizations and schools that have signed on to maintain butterfly habitat this year.

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After 90 Percent Decline, Federal Protection Sought for Monarch Butterfly

August 26, 2014By
After 90 Percent Decline, Federal Protection Sought for Monarch Butterfly

The Center for Biological Diversity and Center for Food Safety as co-lead petitioners joined by the Xerces Society and renowned monarch scientist Dr. Lincoln Brower filed a legal petition today to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service seeking Endangered Species Act protection for monarch butterflies, which have declined by more than 90 percent in under 20 years.

During the same period it is estimated that these once-common iconic orange and black butterflies may have lost more than 165 million acres of habitat…

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How to Create Your Own Monarch Butterfly Rest Stop

August 21, 2014By
How to Create Your Own Monarch Butterfly Rest Stop

Habitat loss and the destruction of native plants have been responsible for the rapid decline of the monarch butterfly, the most recognized butterfly in North America. To help protect these majestic insects as they migrate, citizens in the U.S. are resorting to a simple yet powerful tool: gardening.

Gardens full of milkweed and nectar plants can serve both as rest stops for adult monarchs and as nurseries for their eggs.

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Why You Should Worry About The Butterflies

August 21, 2014By
Why You Should Worry About The Butterflies

We love butterflies, and monarch butterflies are called “monarch” for a reason. They are grand. All that fluttering orange and black display on a winged scale built to impress. To charm. But monarch butterflies are in trouble.

This year saw the smallest migration ever recorded to their winter retreat in the mountains of Mexico.

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Our state butterfly, the monarch, is at risk

July 29, 2014By
Our state butterfly, the monarch, is at risk

The annual migration of the monarch butterfly is one of the great wonders of nature and contains as many mysteries as it does marvels.

Every fall, monarchs migrate across the continent in advance of the cold winter months. Those east of the Rocky Mountains fly to Mexico where they cluster by the millions in the Oyamel fir forests: a mere 12 mountaintop sanctuaries that shelter the overwintering monarchs.

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