Recent Articles

Migratory Monarchs as Messengers of Climate Change

May 7, 2015By
Migratory Monarchs as Messengers of Climate Change

Monarch butterflies: They are the iconic symbols of international cooperation in North America in the face of climate change.

Because of their long distance migration across a variety of climates and habitats, monarchs serve as a messenger of the collective global effects of climate change interacting with a variety of other stressors, natural and human-triggered.

Read More

Will superweeds, regulation create a perfect storm in Iowa farmlands?

May 2, 2015By
Will superweeds, regulation create a perfect storm in Iowa farmlands?

Since the onset of spring, one kind of game-changing news after another has reached Iowa farmers. These announcements will affect the third of the state’s farmers who are struggling to control superweeds by using glyphosates and other herbicides.

New research revelations, government policy changes and farmers’ own dissatisfactions could radically alter both weed and pollinator management in the Midwest.

Read More

What’s killing the monarchs?

April 19, 2015By
What’s killing the monarchs?

In 1996, World Wildlife Fund Mexico counted almost a billion monarch butterflies overwintering in the mountain forests of that country. By 2014 the number had plummeted to just 57 million, a decline of almost 94 percent.

The numbers were even lower the year before when only 34 million monarchs migrated to Mexico.

Read More

Groups file UNESCO petition to save monarch World Heritage Site in Mexico

April 15, 2015By
Groups file UNESCO petition to save monarch World Heritage Site in Mexico

The monarch butterfly refuge in Mexico, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that is winter home to tens of millions of migrating monarchs, should be declared “in danger” because the remarkable transcontinental migration it was established to protect “is at risk of disappearing,” a group of Mexican, American and Canadian civil society and conservation organizations said in a petition today.

Read More

Monarch butterflies: How we can help save them — one garden at a time

April 13, 2015By
Monarch butterflies: How we can help save them — one garden at a time

Monarch butterflies are — quite literally — a force of nature. They strike out each year by the thousands on a four-generation, 3,000-mile-long journey of pure instinct and faith.

They use both inherent and imprinted knowledge. They use subterfuge, placing their eggs on a plant that feeds their young caterpillars, but makes them poisonous and distasteful to predators. They use natural GPS.

Read More

Milkweed Availability Survey

April 3, 2015By
Milkweed Availability Survey

Make Way for Monarchs requests your updates on milkweed seed availability in your region.

According to some garden, nursery and farm journalists, the declines of monarchs created more demand for milkweeds than ever before in American history; and yet, we have no good numbers to document this. Help us explore what’s happening in your community or region by answering one or more of the following questions.

Read More

EPA will require weed-resistance restrictions on glyphosate herbicide

April 2, 2015By
EPA will require weed-resistance restrictions on glyphosate herbicide

U.S. regulators will put new restrictions on the world’s most widely used herbicide to help address the rapid expansion of weeds resistant to the chemical, Reuters has learned.

The Environmental Protection Agency confirmed it will require a weed resistance management plan for glyphosate, the key ingredient in Monsanto’s immensely popular Roundup weed-killer.

Read More

Environmental Engineer and Farmer Nancy Hayden Lives Her Ideals

March 15, 2015By
Environmental Engineer and Farmer Nancy Hayden Lives Her Ideals

Nancy Hayden filled many roles during the Northeast Organic Farming As¬sociation of Vermont’s (NOFA-VT) Winter Conference, on Valentine’s Day weekend, Feb. 14-16. Hayden has attended NOFA-VT’s annual gathering for 22 of its 33 years — as a farmer, workshop leader and artist.

This year, she was there as an exhibitor, for the first time. She prefers farming and painting over marketing.

Read More